Creating a Dog Friendly Backyard For Landlords

Creating a Dog Friendly Backyard For Landlords

It is standard for rental contracts to not allow tenants to have pets. It is obvious why: pets have claws which can damage furniture and decor, they have fur that can be almost impossible to clean away, and they can cause a nuisance to neighbours.

Most tenants understand why landlords are generally reluctant to take pets, but that does not mean that they are always willing to give up their furry friends when they move into a new rented property. The growing number of renters who have been forced out of home ownership may have had their well-loved pets for years. Finding that they cannot get a landlord who will allow them to have pets, they often decide that they will keep their pets regardless, and hope they don’t get found out.

Landlords who find that their tenants have been keeping pets against their contract terms are, of course, within their rights to evict. But with Britain being such a nation of pet-lovers, would it be better if landlords took a more flexible view of pets in their properties? Given the risk that tenants will move their pets in regardless, it can be best to allow pets, but only if certain conditions are met. There are ways for landlords to protect their homes against pet damage.

-Talk to the tenants’ previous landlord before you let – ask for a reference for their pet, as well as for them.
-Consider the type and number of pets: a single cat or small dog is much less likely to cause problems than several cats or a couple of big dogs.
-Ask for an extra deposit to cover any damage caused by the pets.
-Carry out regular inspections to check for damage. If there is any, ask tenants to make it good themselves or you may have to go through your landlords insurance.
-Impose extra conditions on the tenancy: for example, pets to be kept in at night, or tenants to redecorate at the end of the tenancy.

Landlords who do allow pets may find that they reap rewards. Tenants who may have spent several frustrating weeks looking for a landlord who will allow them to keep their pets are likely to want to stay put for a long time rather than repeat the process.

Is it actually possible to own a dog and still have a well manicured, aesthetically pleasing back yard or should you be resigned to a garden full of holes and half trampled plants? The fact is with a little thought, planning and help from a good landscaping professional, a dog friendly landscape is not out of the question. Here are some tips on how to add dog friendly elements to your garden without sacrificing curb appeal and style.

All dogs need exercise, even the very small handbag sized ones so create designated pathways for them to walk, run and patrol. Creating a dog run in your backyard will not only show your canine where he can and cannot roam, it will also help him believe that he is doing his job, patrolling the premises and keeping the humans safe.

If you dog has already created his own pathways through the garden, which many are apt to do, if possible follow those and make them more permanent. Adapting to his preferences may be far easier than trying to train him to follow a completely new path.

If your dog is the Houdini type then some kind of boundary will be called for. Many homeowners are opting for those electronic invisible dog fences that keep Fido in by sending a small electric shock to his collar. These are safe as long as they are installed by someone who really knows what they are doing. The “fence” should be calibrated to your dog’s specific height and weight, otherwise it may not only fail to work but actually harm your dog as well.

Canine waste can ruin the appearance of your landscape as well as make it rather hard to navigate. Designating a specific doggie toilet space can solve that problem. Set aside one spot in the garden and train Fido that he goes there and nowhere else. To encourage him to accept this cover that designated area with a material that he will approve of as well as one that will clean easily. Flagstones, pea gravel and cedar chips are all good choices.

Many animal experts say that if your ornamental plants and flowers are densely planted dogs will tend to stay away by themselves. To make sure though plant in raised beds and consider erecting a temporary ornamental boundary until all your new plants have taken root and Fido has also realized they are off limits.

There are a number of plants that are not at all dog friendly. The effects of these poisonous plants can range from mild tummy upsets to death so consult with a landscaper to make sure the plants you are choosing are not unsafe for canines.

Creating a Dog Friendly Backyard For LandlordsWeeds can also be poisonous, especially wild mushrooms and foxtail grasses, so regular weeding is essential for your pet’s safety as well as the maintenance of the neat appearance of your new dog friendly garden.

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